Printable Press Release

The Travis County Commissioners Court appointed a Citizens Bond Advisory Committee (CBAC) on February 28, 2017, to research Travis County’s current and future infrastructure needs and determine whether a November 2017 bond election is warranted. If a bond election is recommended, the Committee is charged with prioritizing candidate projects and submitting a list of proposals to the Commissioners Court in July 2017. The Committee is considering funding park improvements and natural resource acquisitions, as well as roadway, bicycle, pedestrian, bridge and drainage projects.

The CBAC began meeting on March 9, 2017. The next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, May 4, 2017, at 5:30 pm at the Travis County Administration Building at 700 Lavaca Street on the 1st floor Multifunction Room, B. The public is encouraged to attend any of the meetings to voice an opinion about the proposed projects, or to listen and observe. Meetings are recorded, and may be watched on YouTube at https://www.traviscountytx.gov/cbac. Future meetings will be posted on the County website at www.traviscountytx.gov.

The Commissioners Court agreed to change the County’s bond election policy to allow for more frequent, but much smaller bond requests from the public. County staff will use Construction Obligation bonds that do not require voter approval to design, evaluate and get projects “shovel-ready” before asking Travis County voters to approve construction funding every two to three years rather than the previous practice of asking for voter approval to start a project from scratch, which often takes more than seven years. The last County infrastructure bond election was held in 2011.

“I am grateful to the Travis County residents who are reviewing our 20-year horizon needs,” said Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt. “We look forward to a quality process that can be repeated and allows us to check the progress made toward the greenest, fairest and most mobile Travis County possible. Please watch us work and share your comments and concerns.”

Bonds will be sold to borrow money to pay for major projects. The proposed bonds will be repaid over the next 20 years from property taxes. Bond elections allow voters to approve or reject long-term financing for major capital improvement projects in Travis County. Financing projects through bond authorizations allow for current and future citizens of Travis County to share the cost of improvements that benefit residents County-wide.

Travis County is the only local government responsible for building and maintaining infrastructure in unincorporated areas (outside city limits), which make up approximately 63% of the County’s land mass. Consequently, the County generally builds infrastructure only in unincorporated areas.